Inertial sensor and Timed Up and Go test in elderly women with bone demineralization: a reliability and agreement study

  • Laíla Pereira Gomes da Silva Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Programa de Pós-graduação em Fisioterapia, Recife, Pernambuco, Brasil. Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Núcleo de Investigação em Performance e Saúde, Recife, Pernambuco, Brasil. http://orcid.org/0000-0001-6202-8226
  • Maria das Graças Rodrigues de Araújo Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Programa de Pós-graduação em Fisioterapia, Recife, Pernambuco, Brasil. http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9980-6172
  • André dos Santos Costa Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Núcleo de Investigação em Performance e Saúde, Recife, Pernambuco, Brasil. Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Programa de Pós-Graduação Stricto Sensu em Educação Física, Recife, Pernambuco, Brasil. http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5301-2572
  • Barbara Cristina de Sousa Pedrosa Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Programa de Pós-graduação em Fisioterapia, Recife, Pernambuco, Brasil. Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Laboratório de Imunopatologia Keizo Asami, Programa de Pós-graduação em Biologia Aplicada a Saúde, Recife, Pernambuco, Brasil. https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3938-821X
  • Karla Kristine Dames da Silva Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Programa de Pós-graduação Stricto Sensu em Educação Física, Recife, Pernambuco, Brasil. Instituto Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6604-2823
  • Tony Meireles dos Santos Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Programa de Pós-graduação em Fisioterapia, Recife, Pernambuco, Brasil. Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Núcleo de Investigação em Performance e Saúde, Recife, Pernambuco, Brasil. Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Programa de Pós-Graduação Stricto Sensu em Educação Física, Recife, Pernambuco, Brasil. https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5242-0117
Palavras-chave: Osteoporosis, Ageing, Reproducibility of tests

Resumo

The study aims to assess: 1) reliability test-retest and error measures of quantitative variables of Timed Up and Go (TUG) testing collected with the inertial sensor wireless Wiva ® Science (TUGis), and 2) the agreement of TUGis and the timed method (TUGs) and between the two methods applied to elderly women with osteoporosis and osteopenia. Eighteen elderly women with bone demineralization were enrolled in this study.The time (s) for two executions of the TUG (T1 and T2) was measured with a manual stopwatch by an evaluator and with the inertial sensor attached to the body at the level of the L5 vertebra with remote collection.T1 and T2 were performed with an interval of 1 min. TUG's subtasks were also captured by the inertial sensor. The reliability test-retest and error variables were assessed by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), standard error of measurement (SEm) and minimal detectable change (MDC). The agreement between the averages from the total time of the TUGs and TUGis and between T1 and T2 measured with the sensor and stopwatch were evaluated by the Bland-Altman method. The consistency inside of the subtasks TUGis ranged from substantial to almost complete. The SEm and MDC for TUGis were 1.27s and 2.48s, respectively. The agreement between sensor and stopwatch measurements showed low systematic error. The inertial sensor was reliable in verifying the performance of the TUG and can be a complement for assessing the risk of falls and functional mobility of elderly women with bone demineralization. However, it does not represent an improvement in the exclusive investigation of the total test time.

Downloads

Não há dados estatísticos.

Biografia do Autor

Laíla Pereira Gomes da Silva, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Programa de Pós-graduação em Fisioterapia, Recife, Pernambuco, Brasil. Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Núcleo de Investigação em Performance e Saúde, Recife, Pernambuco, Brasil.

Fisioterapeuta. Mestre em Fisioterapia pelo Programa de Pós-graduação em Fisioterapia, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife (PE), Brasil.

André dos Santos Costa, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Núcleo de Investigação em Performance e Saúde, Recife, Pernambuco, Brasil. Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Programa de Pós-Graduação Stricto Sensu em Educação Física, Recife, Pernambuco, Brasil.

Educador Físico. Doutor em Educação Física Universidade de São Paulo. Departamento de Educação Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife (PE), Brasil.

Barbara Cristina de Sousa Pedrosa, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Programa de Pós-graduação em Fisioterapia, Recife, Pernambuco, Brasil. Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Laboratório de Imunopatologia Keizo Asami, Programa de Pós-graduação em Biologia Aplicada a Saúde, Recife, Pernambuco, Brasil.

Fisioterapeuta. Mestre em Fisioterapia pela Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE). Laboratório de Imunopatologia Keizo Asami (LIKA)Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biologia Aplicada à Saúde (PPGBAS), Recife, Brasil

Karla Kristine Dames da Silva, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Programa de Pós-graduação Stricto Sensu em Educação Física, Recife, Pernambuco, Brasil. Instituto Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil.

Fisioterapeuta. Docente do Instituto Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IFRJ)

Tony Meireles dos Santos, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Programa de Pós-graduação em Fisioterapia, Recife, Pernambuco, Brasil. Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Núcleo de Investigação em Performance e Saúde, Recife, Pernambuco, Brasil. Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Programa de Pós-Graduação Stricto Sensu em Educação Física, Recife, Pernambuco, Brasil.

Educador Físico. Doutor em Educação Física pela Universidade Gama Filho. Departamento de Educação Física. ,Programa de Pós-Graduação Stricto Sensu em Educação Física, Recife, Brasil, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife (PE), Brasil.

Referências

Macedo C, Gazzola JM, Najas M. Síndrome da fragilidade no idoso: importância da fisioterapia. Arq Bras Ciências da Saúde. 2008;20;33(3):177–84.

Siqueira FV, Facchini LA, Silveira DS, Piccini RX, Tomasi E, Thumé E, et al. Prevalence of falls in elderly in Brazil: a countrywide analysis. Cad Saude Publica. 2011;27(9):1819–26.

Ambrose AF, Cruz L, Paul G. Falls and Fractures: A systematic approach to screening and prevention. Maturitas. 2015;82(1):85–93.

Silva RB, Costa-Paiva L, Morais SS, Mezzalira R, Ferreira NO, Pinto-Neto AM. Predictors of falls in women with and without osteoporosis. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther . 2010;40(9):582–8.

Singh DKA, Pillai SGK, Shahar S, Tan ST, Tai CC. Association between physiological falls risk and physical performance tests among community-dwelling older adults. Clin Interv Aging. 2015;10;1319.

Podsiadlo D, Richardson S. The Timed “Up & Go”: A Test of Basic Functional Mobility for Frail Elderly Persons. J Am Geriatr Soc [Internet]. 1991;39;2;142–8.

Schoene D, Wu SM-S, Mikolaizak AS, Menant JC, Smith ST, Delbaere K, et al. Discriminative ability and predictive validity of the timed up and go test in identifying older people who fall: systematic review and meta-analysis. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2013;61(2):202–8.

Hasegawa N, Shah V V, Carlson-Kuhta P, Nutt JG, Horak FB, Mancini M. How to Select Balance Measures Sensitive to Parkinson’s Disease from Body-Worn Inertial Sensors—Separating the Trees from the Forest. Sensors. 2019;19(15):3320.

Greene BR, McManus K, Redmond SJ, Caulfield B, Quinn CC. Digital assessment of falls risk, frailty, and mobility impairment using wearable sensors. npj Digit Med. 2019;2(1).

Sun R, Sosnoff JJ. Novel sensing technology in fall risk assessment in older adults: A systematic review. BMC Geriatr. 2018;18(1).

Beyea J, McGibbon CA, Sexton A, Noble J, O’Connell C. Convergent Validity of a Wearable Sensor System for Measuring Sub-Task Performance during the Timed Up-and-Go Test. Sensors (Basel). 2017; 23;17(4):934.

O’sullivan M, Blake C, Cunningham C, Boyle G, Finucane C. Correlation of accelerometry with clinical balance tests in older fallers and non-fallers. Age Ageing. 2009;38(3):308–13.

Cultrera P, Pratelli E, Petrai V, Postiglione M, Zambelan G, Pasquetti P. Evaluation with stabilometric platform of balance disorders in osteoporosis patients. A proposal for a diagnostic protocol. Clin Cases Miner Bone Metab. 2010;7(2):123–5.

Montesinos L, Castaldo R, Pecchia L. Wearable Inertial Sensors for Fall Risk Assessment and Prediction in Older Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng. 2018;(99):1.

Galán-Mercant A, Barón-López JJ, Labajos-Manzanares MT, Cuesta-Vargas AI. Reliability and criterion-related validity with a smartphone used in timed-up-and-go test. Biomed Eng Online. 2014;13(1):1–11.

Van Lummel RC, Walgaard S, Hobert MA, Maetzler W, Van Dieën JH, Galindo-Garre F, et al. Intra-Rater, Inter-Rater and Test-Retest Reliability of an Instrumented Timed Up and Go (iTUG) Test in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease. Stamatakis EA, editor. PLoS One. 2016;21;11(3).

McGrath D, Greene BR, Doheny EP, McKeown DJ, De Vito G, Caulfield B. Reliability of quantitative TUG measures of mobility for use in falls risk assessment. In: 2011 Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society [Internet]. IEEE; 2011. p. 466–9. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22254349.

WHO. WHO Global Report on Falls Prevention in Older Age. Community Health. 2007.

Re-imagined H. Lunar Prodigy Primo. 2008.

Kottner J, Audige L, Brorson S, Donner A, Gajewski BJ, Hróbjartsson A, et al. Guidelines for Reporting Reliability and Agreement Studies (GRRAS) were proposed. Int J Nurs Stud [Internet]. 2011 Jun;48(6):661–71.

Howcroft J, Kofman J, Lemaire ED. Review of fall risk assessment in geriatric populations using inertial sensors. J Neuroeng Rehabil [Internet]. 2013;10(1):91.

Drover D, Howcroft J, Kofman J, Lemaire E. Faller Classification in Older Adults Using Wearable Sensors Based on Turn and Straight-Walking Accelerometer-Based Features. Sensors. 2017; 7;17(6):1321.

Shrout PE, Fleiss JL. Intraclass correlations: uses in assessing rater reliability. Psychol Bull. 1979 Mar;86(2):420–8.

Miot HA. Análise de concordância em estudos clínicos e experimentais. J Vasc Bras. 2016 Jun;15(2):89–92.

Hopkins WG. Measures of reliability in sports medicine and science. Sports Med. 2000;30(1):1–15.

Stockbrugger BA, Haennel RG. Validity and reliability of a medicine ball explosive power test. J strength Cond Res. 2001/12/01. 2001 Nov;15(4):431–8.

Vervoort D, Vuillerme N, Kosse N, Hortobágyi T, Lamoth CJC. Multivariate analyses and classification of inertial sensor data to identify aging effects on the timed-Up-and-Go test. PLoS One. 2016;11(6):1–17.

Zakaria NA, Kuwae Y, Tamura T, Minato K, Kanaya S. Quantitative analysis of fall risk using TUG test. Comput Methods Biomech Biomed Engin. 2013;5842:37–41.

Nguyen HP, Ayachi F, Lavigne–Pelletier C, Blamoutier M, Rahimi F, Boissy P, et al. Auto detection and segmentation of physical activities during a Timed-Up-and-Go (TUG) task in healthy older adults using multiple inertial sensors. J Neuroeng Rehabil . 2015 11;12(1):36.

Weiss A, Mirelman A, Giladi N, Barnes LL, Bennett DA, Buchman AS, et al. Transition Between the Timed up and Go Turn to Sit Subtasks: Is Timing Everything? J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2016;17(9):864.e9-864.e15.

Publicado
17-12-2020
Seção
Artigos Originais