Efeito do tempo sentado prolongado sobre marcadores cardiometabólicos em adultos fisicamente ativos e inativos: um estudo piloto

  • Geovani Araújo Dantas Macêdo Programa de Pós-Graduação em Educação Física. Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte. Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil. Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte. Departamento de Educação Física. Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil. https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1160-0541
  • Yuri Alberto Freire Programa de Pós-Graduação em Educação Física. Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte. Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil. Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte. Departamento de Educação Física. Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil. https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8434-8888
  • Rodrigo Alberto Vieira Browne Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde. Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte. Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil. Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte. Departamento de Educação Física. Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil. https://orcid.org/0000-0003-3005-247X
  • Luiz Fernando Farias-Junior Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde. Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte. Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil. Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte. Departamento de Educação Física. Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil. https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4546-3079
  • Ludmila Lucena Pereira Cabral Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde. Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte. Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil. Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte. Departamento de Educação Física. Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil. https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0803-4681
  • Gabriel Costa Souto Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte. Departamento de Educação Física. Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil. https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9096-8338
  • Iasmin Matias de Sousa Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte. Departamento de Nutrição. Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil. https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6076-3024
  • José Cazuza de Farias Júnior Universidade Federal do Paraíba. Departamento de Educação Física. João Pessoa, Paraíba, Brasil. https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1082-6098
  • Ana Paula Trussardi Fayh Programa de Pós-Graduação em Educação Física. Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte. Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil. Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte. Departamento de Nutrição. Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil. https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9130-9630
  • Eduardo Caldas Costa Programa de Pós-Graduação em Educação Física. Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte. Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde. Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte. Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil. Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte. Departamento de Educação Física. Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil. https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2807-7109
Palavras-chave: Estilo de vida sedentário, Atividade física, Exercício físico, Fatores de risco

Resumo

O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar o efeito do tempo sentado prolongado sobre marcadores cardiometabólicos em adultos fisicamente ativos e inativos. Participaram do estudo 10 adultos fisicamente ativos (27,30 ± 4,90 anos de idade) e 11 fisicamente inativos (26,27 ± 3,17 anos de idade). Todos realizaram uma sessão de tempo sentado prolongado de 10 horas, com quatro refeições padronizadas. Os níveis de glicose e pressão arterial foram mensurados no jejum, antes e 1 hora após cada refeição e também 2 horas após o almoço. Os níveis de triglicerídeos foram medidos no jejum, 2 e 3,5 horas após o almoço. O modelo linear generalizado foi utilizado para comparar a área sob a curva incremental (ASCi) dos níveis de glicose e triglicerídeos e a área sob a curva (ASC) dos níveis de pressão arterial entre os grupos, com ajuste pelos valores de linha de base. O grupo fisicamente ativo apresentou menor ASCi para os níveis de glicose no período de 10 horas (β = -5,55 mg/dL/10h; IC95%: -9,75; -1,33; p = 0,010) e no período da manhã (β = -7,05 mg/dL/5h; IC95%: -12,11; -1,99; p = 0,006) comparado ao grupo fisicamente inativo. Não houve diferença da ASCi dos triglicerídeos (p = 0,517) e na ASC da pressão arterial (p = 0,145) entre os grupos. Em conclusão, adultos fisicamente ativos apresentaram melhor controle glicêmico comparados àqueles fisicamente inativos durante a exposição a tempo sentado prolongado.

Downloads

Não há dados estatísticos.

Referências

Ekelund U, Steene-Johannessen J, Brown WJ, Fagerland MW, Owen N, Powell KE, et al. Does physical activity attenuate, or even eliminate, the detrimental association of sitting time with mortality? A harmonised meta-analysis of data from more than 1 million men and women. Lancet. 2016;388(10051):1302–10.

Garber CE, Blissmer B, Deschenes MR, Franklin BA, Lamonte MJ, Lee I-MM, et al. Quantity and quality of exercise for developing and maintaining cardiorespiratory, musculoskeletal, and neuromotor fitness in apparently healthy adults. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2011;43(7):1334–59.

Coombes JS, Law J, Lancashire B, Fassett RG. "Exercise is Medicine": curbing the burden of chronic disease and physical inactivity. Asia Pac J Public Health. 2015;27(2):NP600-5.

Ng SW, Popkin BM. Time use and physical activity: a shift away from movement across the globe. Obes Rev. 2012;13(8):659–80.

Lee IM, Shiroma EJ, Lobelo F, Puska P, Blair SN, Katzmarzyk PT. Impact of physical inactivity on the world’s major non- communicable diseases. Lancet. 2012;380(9838):219–29.

Tremblay MS, Aubert S, Barnes JD, Saunders TJ, Carson V, Latimer-Cheung AE, et al. Sedentary Behavior Research Network (SBRN) – Terminology Consensus Project process and outcome. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2017;14(1):75.

Biswas A, Oh PI, Faulkner GE, Bajaj RR, Silver MA, Mitchell MS, et al. Sedentary time and its association with risk for disease incidence, mortality, and hospitalization in adults. Ann Intern Med. 2015;162(2):123-32.

Bailey DP, Locke CD. Breaking up prolonged sitting with light-intensity walking improves postprandial glycemia, but breaking up sitting with standing does not. J Sci Med Sport. 2015;18(3):294–8.

Homer AR, Fenemor SP, Perry TL, Rehrer NJ, Cameron CM, Skeaff CM, et al. Regular activity breaks combined with physical activity improve postprandial plasma triglyceride, nonesterified fatty acid, and insulin responses in healthy, normal weight adults: A randomized crossover trial. J Clin Lipidol. 2017;11(5):1268-79.

Larsen RN, Kingwell BA, Sethi P, Cerin E, Owen N, Dunstan DW. Breaking up prolonged sitting reduces resting blood pressure in overweight/obese adults. Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2014;24(9):976–82.

Carter S, Hartman Y, Holder S, Thijssen DH, Hopkins ND. Sedentary behavior and cardiovascular disease risk: mediating mechanisms. Exerc Sport Sci Rev. 2017;45(2):80–6.

Hamilton MT, Hamilton DG, Zderic TW. Role of low energy expenditure and sitting in obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Diabetes. 2007;56(11):2655–67.

Craig CL, Marshall AL, Sjojtrom M, Bauman AE, Booth ML, Ainworth BE, et al. International Physical Activity Questionnaire: 12-Country Reliability and Validity. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2003;35(8):1381–95.

Bhammar DM, Sawyer BJ, Tucker WJ, Gaesser GA, Science E, Lifestyles H, et al. Breaks in sitting time: effects on continuously monitored glucose and blood pressure. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2017;49(10):2119–30.

Bouchard C, Tremblay A, Leblanc C, Lortie G, Savard R, Thériault G. A method to assess energy expenditure in children and adults. Am J Clin Nutr. 1983;37(3):461–7.

Miyashita M, Takahashi M, Suzuki K, Stensel D, Nakamura Y, Sciences H, et al. Postprandial Lipaemia: effects of sitting, standing and walking in healthy normolipidaemic humans. Int J Sports Med. 2013;34(1):21–7.

June S, Maraki M, Kavouras SA. Validity of abbreviated oral fat tolerance tests for assessing postprandial lipemia. Clin Nutr. 2011;30(6):852–7.

Levitan EB, Song Y, Ford ES, Liu S. Is nondiabetic hyperglycemia a risk factor for cardiovascular disease? A meta-analysis of prospective studies. Arch Intern Med. 2004;164(19):2147-55.

Bergouignan A, Latouche C, Heywood S, Grace MS, Reddy-Luthmoodoo M, Natoli AK, et al. Frequent interruptions of sedentary time modulates contraction- and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake pathways in muscle: Ancillary analysis from randomized clinical trials. Sci Rep. 2016;6(1):32044.

Duvivier BM, Schaper NC, Bremers MA, van Crombrugge G, Menheere PP, Kars M, et al. Minimal intensity physical activity (standing and walking) of longer duration improves insulin action and plasma lipids more than shorter periods of moderate to vigorous exercise (cycling) in sedentary subjects when energy expenditure is comparable. PLoS One. 2013;8(2):e55542.

Lewington S, Clarke R, Qizilbash N, Peto R, Collins R; Prospective Studies Collaboration. Age-specific relevance of usual blood pressure to vascular mortality: a meta-analysis of individual data for one million adults in 61 prospective studies. Lancet. 2002;360(9349):1903-13

Beunza JJ, Martínez-González MA, Ebrahim S, Bes-Rastrollo M, Núñez J, Martínez JA, et al. Sedentary behaviors and the risk of incident hypertension: the SUN Cohort. Am J Hypertens. 2007;20(11):1156-62

Hamilton MT, Hamilton DG, Zderic TW. Exercise physiology versus inactivity physiology: an essential concept for understanding lipoprotein lipase regulation. Exerc Sport Sci Rev. 2004;32(4):161–6.

Dunstan DW, Kingwell BA, Larsen R, Healy GN, Cerin E, Hamilton MT, et al. Breaking up prolonged sitting reduces postprandial glucose and insulin responses. Diabetes Care. 2012;35(5):976-83.

Publicado
02-08-2019
Seção
Artigos Originais